Sora By Lito: Motorcycle Features Incorporated In A Modern Bycicle

From carbon-fiber bodywork to high-performance Ohlins suspension, the Sora by Lito has all the trimmings you’d expect from an exotic, six-figure motorcycle—except for an engine. The Sora is the most luxurious all-electric motorcycle on the market, an expanding field that now includes speed demons like the Zero SR and the Lightning LS-218. But where other electric bikes are remarkable, the Sora is extraordinary.

Hand-built in Quebec, the bike hits a liquid-cooled AC induction electric motor with 66 lb-ft of torque that is fully available the moment your hand twitches. You fling forward instantaneously, doing zero to 60 mph in 4 seconds, quicker than a Porsche 718 Cayman. The motor pulls its energy from a lithium-ion battery pack mounted under the faux fuel tank and sends power through a continuously variable transmission, which means no shifting gears like you would on a conventional motorcycle.

The zero-emission Sora can be fully charged in 3.5 hours from a 220-volt quick-charging station or eight hours from a regular no-volt wall outlet. In “sate range” driving mode, it can also calculate the distance between you and your destination and determine how much power it needs to get you there; just input an address and it does the rest.

And yes, the Sora has a built-in, 5.7-inch touchscreen navigation system, one of many such features you rarely see on two wheels, which include a storage compartment with a USB port for your phone and an electrically adjustable seat that can go up and down as you ride. The higher-end Signature Series, which owners can customize to their liking for a $27,000 premium, also comes with lightweight carbon-fiber wheels and components sourced from around the world, like Beringer brakes from France and Rizoma mirrors from Italy.

 

“When I first saw the bike, it was like seeing something from another planet.” says Nieholai Allen, a partner at Lito. “You have a crowd in two seconds, no matter where you go, even in Beverly Hills.” Just 17 Soras are currently on the road, but Lito predicts they’ll soon be producing 200 to 400 bikes annually.

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