Ford Anglia 105E/123E Super – 1959 – 1962

Although it was designed, according to the philosophy of its era, to fit into an existing range of Ford cars, the Anglia 105E was all new. As a two-door, four-seater family saloon it broke completely with traditional styling.

The wind-tunnel tested and streamlined smoothness of its swept-back nose and flat roof line, the muted tailfins, and reverse-raked rear window (like contemporary Lincolns and Mercurys) suggested American glamour even in the standard budget version. Most people opted for the 105E Deluxe, with a full width grille, chrome side strips and rear light surrounds, and two-tone trim.

Equally exciting was the innovative 105E engine, a gleaming 997cc OHV (overhead valve) straight four which became the basis of Ford engines for many years. Easy to tune, and as tweakable’ as the styling (Ford Marketing supplied a never-ending selection of add-ons), the Kent engine quickly became beloved of hot-rodders. In fact the 105E was so successful on all counts that in 1962 Ford introduced what it believed to be the car’s apotheosis — the Anglia 123E Super. It had more chrome, more comfort, more power and more flash; and corresponded exactly to a national mood.

The 105E/123E is what people mean by an Anglia. It has never been out of style. As one generation of drivers enjoyed it and moved on, another discovered its motor sport potential. It’s instantly recognizable on the track or in the street, an icon of a peculiarly British vision of modernity. Now it’s loved for its retro-chic and adaptability at every level. A blue 105E featured (airborne, and magically customized to hold nine people!) in the film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, demonstrating conclusively how the Anglia is cherished.

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN:

UK

FIRST MANUFACTURED:

1959 (105E); 1962 (123E) (until 1967)

ENGINE:

997cc (105E), 1,198cc (123E) OHV Straight Four

PERFORMANCE:

Top speed of 74 mph (119 km/h)

YOU SHOULD KNOW:

In 1962 a Ford Anglia 105E was driven for seven days and nights at the Montlhery circuit near Paris, at an average speed of more than 83 mph (133 km/h). It set six new world records for a car under 1,000 cc.

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